A Frothy Mug in the Houses of Liberty

Free speech in the coffee houses of Europe and America birthed the rise of gentility, republican government, and liberty during a time of, as Beatrix Potter said, “swords and periwigs and full-skirted coats with flowered lappets – when gentlemen wore ruffles, and gold-laced waistcoats of paduasoy and taffeta…” Whether philosophical men between sips passionately debated…

A Tribute to the Second Battle of the Marne

As we approach July 17th, the landmark date for the beginning of the Second Battle of the Marne, I thought it appropriate to wrap up the World War I theme. I’ve composed a poem, perhaps from the perspective of the French or British soldiers during the Allied counter offensive of the battle, in which the…

The Magna Carta: Signed June 15, 1215

“Our king a mock, a coward he Did fail our land across the sea! His sword was blunt, his armor weak, From lack of use with rust did creak. “And after this expensive venture, He earned the Roman Pope’s censure, Till we like Joseph have been sold, As slaves, by a friend and brother cold.…

Sir Edward Elgar: The Last Bard of Great Britain

Although the light of his musical genius has faded with the passing of time and fancy, Sir Edward Elgar resurrected English Classical music from a long slumber to a climax of patriotic fervor by setting to music the strongest British sentiments that ever beat in an Edwardian Englishman’s heart. With the performance of Elgar’s Coronation…

The Battle of Formigny: England vs. France (April 15, 1450)

Much of Western Civilization in Western Europe has been characterized by the nationalistic animosity between England and France that took two world wars to finally end. But where did this animosity come from? In 1066, the Duke of Normandy (France) invaded England, dethroned Edward the Confessor, and became known as William the Conqueror. At that…

Sir Robert Walpole: A New Executive

If ever a glorious concept of government arose from a scandalous politician, Sir Robert’s Walpole’s career would fit the description.  Walpole politically defined the executive for the rest of the Western World to follow.  On the surface of it, Walpole did little to advance liberty through his policy, but his political organization did much to…

A Jubilee for Liberty!

Two hundred and fifty years ago, someone was born who was destined to liberate millions, fated to beg for liberty before the most powerful in the world and created to ban slavery throughout the most expansive empire the world has yet seen.  Read more on Landmarks of Liberty. E. Wesley – Mackinac Center Intern